Monday, November 24, 2014

10 useful Avid console commands

http://www.digitalrebellion.com/blog/posts/10_useful_avid_console_commands.html

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

45 Minutes of Free DaVinci Resolve 11.1 Training | Jonny Elwyn - Film Editor

45 Minutes of Free DaVinci Resolve 11.1 Training | Jonny Elwyn - Film Editor



Patrick Inhofer and the boys from Mixing Light.com
have recently released a huge new training series of 131 individual
lessons lasting over 14 hours! You can read all about it on the Mixing Light Davinci Resolve 11 Deep Insights page. If you’ve never heard of Mixing Light.com, it is a subscription membership site for colorist’s of all skill levels and I’ve previously reviewed it here.

With the launch of the Deep Insights training they are giving away 45
minutes of free training from the tutorial series which you can enjoy
below. If you want to download Resolve 11.1.1 (out this week) then you
can grab it from blackmagicdesign.com.

With so much paid for training available online how do you know which
one you should invest in with not only your money, but your precious
time?

I’ve been in touch with Mixing Light, Ripple Training and FXPHD to
get hold of review copies of all of their DaVinci Resolve tutorial
packages, which they have all generously supplied and once I get through
them all, I’ll be posting an extensive review on the blog, so stay
tuned for that or sign up for my free weekly newsletter to not miss it.



















Not to be out-done Alexis Van Hurkman has recently released his own
19 hour training series (in two parts – Editing in Resolve 11 and Colour
Grading in Resolve 11) over on Ripple Training. As mentioned many times Alexis is the author of the very excellent Resolve manual and the even more excellent Colour Correction Handbook.


For the past month or so, Alexis has been tweeting some great Resolve
tips and tricks and I’ve gathered them all together for your
edification. I’ll be updating this post with any new tip tweets.

REVIEW: DaVinci Resolve 11 11/03/14

Resolve_DRYAs a freelance editor, if you asked me what I wanted for Xmas last year, it wouldn’t have been yet another NLE to learn.
I criss-cross the Bay Area editing videos (typically marketing) for brands large and small, using Premiere Pro, Final Cut Pro 7, Final Cut Pro X and sometimes Avid Symphony.
It’s a lot of apps, systems, people and workflows to juggle.
And speaking of workflow, one of the missing pieces is a dedicated color app so that I can go beyond the limitations of color filters within the NLEs I use.
Adobe has made a lot of strides lately with its color app SpeedGrade, but it’s still Adobe-centric and has only recently added an acceptable round-tripping workflow.
That’s why I’ve been very interested for a while in trying DaVinci Resolve, hoping that it would be more NLE agnostic.
A lot of people have talked about it’s robust XML and user friendly UI and at NAB this year they unveiled extensive editing functionality.
That’s one of the biggest reasons I included Resolve in our month on The New Fundamentals.
As we take a look at apps, sites, books and trends on accepted and emerging best practices, it makes sense to look closer at how Resolve is evolving.
Launched a decade ago by DaVinci Systems, Resolve was bought by Blackmagic Design in 2009 and was eventually spun off into three versions.
Class is in session with Alexis Van Hurkman's Editing in Resolve training.
Class is in session with Alexis Van Hurkman’s Editing in Resolve training.
The $29,995 version includes panels, the $999 version is software only and the Lite version of the software is free.
What’s most important to note is how much the Lite version can do. As of version 11, you can edit, monitor and even deliver 4K media (3840×2160 limit).
As an editor and for the kinds of projects I work on, I am mainly interested in using Resolve for shot matching and occasionally, tracking.
These are things that are a pain to do in an NLE, but since I’ve never used Resolve (or any color specific app) before, I had to learn it from scratch before I could even write this review.
Thank God for the newly released Ripple Training title focused on the editing features in Resolve 11.
It got me up to speed, and I took extensive notes as I went along so that I could refer to them for the review.

GENERAL IMPRESSIONS

So before I get into the details of what I like and don’t like, my overall impression is that I really like using this app. The look and feel seems well thought out and navigating the edit page is very intuitive.
And yes, there are a lot of similarities to FCP X, but most of the editing features in Resolve have more in common with traditional NLEs – and that’s a good thing.
So, if you know how to use FCP 7, Premiere or Media Composer, you’ll feel quite at home in Resolve and experience very little in the way of a learning curve.

HIGHLIGHTS

There’s so much I like, that I don’t know where to begin – so I’ll list highlights in no particular order:

Using XML to bring in NLE sequences is very straightforward:

I was able to import sequences from PPro, FCP X and FCP 7 with no problem.
I was able to import sequences from Premiere Pro, FCP X and FCP 7 with no problem.

Optical Flow:

Yup. Just like FCP X.
Yup. Just like FCP X.

Compatibility with OFX plugins:

OFX plugins like Neat Video and FilmConvert are must haves.
OFX plugins like Neat Video and FilmConvert are must haves.

The Image Wipe and Split Screen features to match color:

IMAGE WIPE: Clicking and dragging on the dividing line allows you to wipe between the two images.
Clicking and dragging on the dividing line allows you to wipe between the two images.
Compare up to 16 clips at a time. This really helps you get a birds eye view of your grade and greatly improves   the speed at which you can match shots.
Compare up to 16 clips at a time. This really helps you get a birds-eye view of your grade and greatly improves the speed at which you can match shots.

The node viewer:

The arrangement of nodes give you precise control of grade operations. It may take a while for editors not used to node based apps like Smoke or Nuke to get used to this though. But the degree to which you can embrace nodes, the efficient your grading workflow will be .
The arrangement of nodes give you precise control of grade operations. It may take a while for editors not used to node based apps like Smoke or Nuke to get used to this though (join the club). But the degree to which we can embrace nodes, the more efficient our grading workflow will be .

Object tracking features:

One of the chief reasons I'm looking forward to using Resolve: being able to make corrections on a moving object within the frame, like faces.
One of the chief reasons I’m looking forward to using Resolve: being able to make corrections on a moving object within the frame – like faces.

The very intuitive delivery page:

It was a great idea to have simple, intermediate and advanced tabs to hide undue complexity for those that don't need it. WHY can’t Media Encoder be this simple to use?!?!?!
It was a great idea to have Basic, Intermediate and Advanced tabs to hide undue complexity for those that don’t need it. WHY can’t Media Encoder be this simple to use?!?!?!

The way Resolve handles metadata:

Being able to create custom metadata sets, lets you tailor projects to specific workflows and situations.
Being able to create custom metadata sets, lets you tailor projects to specific workflows and situations.

The take selector:

Like the Audition feature in FCP X, the Take Selector let's you easily swap out different takes.
Like the Audition feature in FCP X, the Take Selector lets you easily swap out different takes.

A little more geeky:

  • Granular cache controls
  • The clone tool for creating checksum directories. Great for DITs.
  • Being able to dynamically toggle between play and decode quality so, for instance, when you’re parked on a clip you will see it in full 4K but when it plays you can set it to only display a 1080 version of the clip.
  • Resolution independence.
  • Being able to make track heights very big (would love to be able to do this in FCP X).
  • Linked clips (audio and video) have a dot on the left corner of the clip so that you can see at a glance if audio and video are attached.
  • Having the option to use either a video or film dissolve. And you can also do a dissolve using blend modes.
  • A built in keyframe editor inside of each clip.
  • Smart caching

LOWLIGHTS

In contrast, there’s not a whole lot I didn’t like. Considering that this is version 1 of the NLE in Resolve, that says a lot.
In no particular order:
  • Not being able to sync audio based on waveforms. You can only do it based on timecode or manually.
  • Not being able to make windows full screen (Adobe, you’ve spoiled me).
  • The 3D tracker is a point tracker, so if you need to use a robust planar tracker for a shot, you’re going to have to use Mocha Pro.
  • Crop does not have edge softness. This should be federally mandated for any company creating an NLE.

FINAL THOUGHTS

bokeh_WETSo the million dollar question: who, when and why would one use Resolve? Ok that’s more than one question.
I think in general, the editors that will be interested in Resolve are those who find FCP X too bizarre (still) and consider Premiere Pro (I believe wrongly) ransom ware and Avid Symphony too limited.
But I don’t think it will be editors using the editing functions in Resolve – at first.
Editing in Resolve is going to be more attractive to indie cinematographers and directors that are already using Resolve for color. Now, instead of waiting to get a “locked” cut from the editor, they can take a stab at doing the cut themselves. Now they’ll be able to guide their vision all the way to final delivery.
630_bmcc-field_WETAnd now that Blackmagic Design has purchased VFX company Eyeon, I think Resolve is emerging as a dark horse. One could easily see a robust effects page being added at the bottom of the UI that puts all of the Eyeon magic right into Resolve.
Imagine that, having an editing app that does a lot of other things very well.
Well, I think you could imagine it, it’s called Autodesk Smoke and Autodesk’s got to be a little concerned at where this is all heading.
And the fact that Blackmagic Design is giving away this 4K capable Lite version for free is adding even more insult to injury.
In the meantime, it’s potentially another NLE that I’ll have to learn and master.
But I don’t mind. Blackmagic Design has amazingly gotten a lot of things right in their initial foray into the cutting room.
It’ll be interesting to see see where it all goes from here.

Links: